Law Blog Tag: CFIRA

FINRA Seeks Public Comment in Advance of Crowdfunding Rulemaking

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has requested public comment and input in advance of preparing and publishing proposed rules related to the Crowdfunding Act. The scope of the FINRA rules will be written specifically for registered funding portals and although they will need to be complementary to the SEC rules, it is intended that they not be duplicative. FINRA has set August 31, 2012 as the deadline for receiving comments.

SEC Staff Meeting with National Crowdfunding Association

On May 14, 2012, the SEC staff met with representative of the National Crowdfunding Association to discuss issues regarding the implementation of Title III of the JOBS Act, i.e. the Crowdfunding Act. The SEC posted a memo on the meeting, which is available for review on the SEC website. This blog summarizes the memo, which memo was prepared by the National Crowdfunding Association prior to the meeting as an agenda and discussion memo and was subsequently posted on the SEC website, by the SEC.

National Crowdfunding Association Compiles List of Issues and Comments

CFIRA Submits Crowdfunding Letter to SEC

The CFIRA (Crowdfund Intermediaries Regulatory Advocates) was established by crowdfunding industry professionals for the purpose of working with the SEC and FINRA on establishing and maintaining crowdfunding rules and industry practices. As I blogged in the past, I believed at one point, based on news and information released from the CFIRA, that the CFIRA intended to become a self regulatory organization (SRO) and register with the SEC under Section 15A. As of today, it appears that the CFIRA is still working towards the goal of becoming an SRO. In any event, I expect that the CFIRA will be an active participant in the crowdfunding industry and invaluable source of input and information.

Crowdfunding intermediaries- Hurry Up and Wait

On April 5, 2012 President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law. Part of the JOBS Act is the Crowdfunding Act, the full title of which is the “Capital Raising Online While Deterring Fraud and Unethical Non-Disclosure Act of 2012”. I think the acronym came first, but applaud the creativity.

I have been blogging extensively on the JOBS Act and Crowdfunding Act. My last blog addressed Herculean effort the SEC must undertake to write the laws and rules which will bring the Crowdfunding Act to fruition by early 2013. In addition to fashioning the exemption that will allow companies to raise funds using the Crowdfunding Act, the SEC must also fashion rules to govern the funding portals that companies will be required to use in the process.

SEC Grapples With Crowdfunding Rulemaking

On April 5, 2012 President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law.

The SEC’s Rulemaking Duty

Some of the rules went into effect immediately; others are in the drafting process. Within 90 days of the signing of the Act (i.e. mid July), the SEC is required to issue enabling rules as to other portions of the Act, including rules related to general solicitation and advertising of accredited investors under Rule 506 of Regulation D. For the SEC that is the easy part.

SEC Issues Guidance on Title 1 of the JOBS Act

On April 5, 2012 President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law. Some of the rules went into effect immediately; others are busily in the drafting process. The SEC has begun issuing guidance and it is expected will continue to do so often.

Crowdfunding Timing and Investor Protections

On April 5, 2012 President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law.

Some of the rules went into effect immediately, such as the ability of an Emerging Growth Company to file a registration statement and seek confidential treatment during the review process. For this process the EGC would avail itself of the new Securities Act Section 6(e). The SEC issued, albeit limited, guidance on this process for EGC’s yesterday, April 10, 2012.

Crowdfunding Act Signed Into Law

On April 5, 2012 President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law. In accordance with the JOBS Act requirement that all crowdfunding platforms (i.e. websites and intermediaries) be a member of a national securities association, the new self regulatory organization (SRO), The Crowdfunding Intermediary Regulatory Association (CFIRA) has already been formed. The CFIRA will be charged with ensuring investor protection and market integrity. The CFIRA will have members from crowdfunding investor intermediaries as well as related industries such as venture capital firms. In addition to regulating its members, the CFIRA will provide investors with information such as learning about crowdfunding and its risks.

Crowdfunding 101

As I recently blogged, the President has signed the Jobs Act including the much anticipated Crowdfunding bill. Crowdfunding is a process whereby companies will be able to raise small amounts of money either directly off their own website or using intermediaries set up for the purpose. The Securities Act of 1933, as amended, (Securities Act) prohibits the sale or delivery of any security unless such security is either registered or exempt from registration. Crowdfunding will be an exemption from registration. The exemption will likely be codified as a new and separate exemption likely under Regulation D and will include an overhaul of the current general provisions of Regulation D found in Rules 501-503.