Law Blog Tag: convertible debt

SEC Staff Meeting with National Crowdfunding Association

On May 14, 2012, the SEC staff met with representative of the National Crowdfunding Association to discuss issues regarding the implementation of Title III of the JOBS Act, i.e. the Crowdfunding Act. The SEC posted a memo on the meeting, which is available for review on the SEC website. This blog summarizes the memo, which memo was prepared by the National Crowdfunding Association prior to the meeting as an agenda and discussion memo and was subsequently posted on the SEC website, by the SEC.

National Crowdfunding Association Compiles List of Issues and Comments

Convertible Promissory Notes; Flexible Financing Options

I have explored the topic of promissory notes in previous articles. This analysis shall specifically concentrate on convertible promissory notes.

As a reminder, a promissory note is a written promise by a person, persons or entity to pay a specific amount of money (called “principal”) to another, usually to include a specified amount of interest on the unpaid principal amount. In addition, a promissory note will include the basic specifics of the debt, including the debtor and creditor, when payment or payments are due, interest rates, if the debt is secured, and whether the debt may be converted into stock or other equity. A promissory note that may be converted is often referred to as either a debenture or a convertible promissory note.

An Introduction to Promissory Notes

August 04, 2011 in Uncategorized

A promissory note is a written promise by a person, persons or entity to pay a specific amount of money (called “principal”) to another, usually to include a specified amount of interest on the unpaid principal amount. In addition, a promissory note will include the basic specifics of the debt, including full names of both debtor and creditor and an address for making payments. The specified time of payment may be written as: a) whenever there is a demand, b) on a specific date, c) in installments with or without the interest included in each installment, d) installments with a final larger amount (balloon payment). In the event that the written note does not include language specifying the time of payment, the law assumes it is payable on demand by the creditor.

The Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) Provides Guidance Regarding Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933

Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (“Securities Act”) is an exemption from the Securities Act registration requirements for the offers and sales of securities by Issuers. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has given guidance on the operation of Section 3(a)(10) in its Division of Corporation Finance: Revised Staff Legal Bulleting No. 3. Read the Legal & Compliance analysis and review of their advice and recommendations.